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By admin
5 Nov 2011

Types of Joinery

Using traditional methods, Christian will join the timber components together ensuring the optimum strength and allowing the timber to move seasonally without compromising the stability of the joint.

dovetail joint

Dovetails joint
Dovetail joints are commonly used to join drawer edges together. One of the strongest joints providing stability and an attractive finish. These joints should fit together perfectly and match each other.

Miter joint

Miter joint
Commonly used to join corners. 45-degree cuts made on the ends of adjacent boards they then come together to form a 90 – degree angle. These should meet perfectly have no gaps and leave a near invisible line where the boards have joined.

Tongue and Groove joint

Tongue and Groove joint
Often used to form wider boards from narrow pieces, i.e., tabletops. The joint allowed for seasonal expansion and shrinkage of the individual boards while creating an airtight wall.

Biscuit Joint

Biscuit Joint
A butt joint that is reinforced with a football shaped “biscuit”. The biscuits are usually made from compressed pieces of wood, usually birch. When a biscuit comes into contact with glue in the joint it swells creating a tighter joint.

tenon joint

Mortise and Tenon joint
A mortise is a non-round hole usually cut with a router, in a piece of wood, for the purpose of accepting a tenon. A Tenon is a projecting end grain tongue of wood usually cut or formed with a router or table saw. It is formed so as to fit snuggly into it’s mating mortise which has been cut accordingly. The tenon is inserted into the mortise and when glued, makes a very neat and a very strong means of joinery.

Half Housed joint

Half Housed joint
A groove, which is usually cut across the grain, to then allow a fixed vertical piece inside it. Typically used to fix shelving.

Dowel joint

Dowel joint
The dowel joint joins timber in a similar way to mortise and tenons tongue and grooves and dovetails. Instead, however timber pegs are used to fix.

Floating tenon

Floating tenon
Similar concept to biscuit joining. A separate tenon is placed into the ends of two mortices.